FATAL LAKEFRONT

Something strange is occurring in Prospect Park that’s beyond our philosophy to unravel. We may have coyotes, along with various other forms of wild life, running free through NYC; the city is a “melting pot” for such diversity. However, over the past couple of weeks, a new and exotic (perhaps even esoteric) form of someone or something is frequenting Prospect Park…more accurately, is striking Prospect Park.

A series of animal butcheries and other strange goings-on have park officials mystified. The bizarre events began earlier this month on the shoreline of the park’s lake when a woman spotted several disembodied turtle shells. Shortly after this, a large area of scorched reeds (a reckless attempt at a fire) was found near the lakeshore. Then chicken heads and animal entrails, blood-soaked patches of turf and undergrowth, were discovered; it was determined that several animals had been slaughtered to leave so much carnage behind.

Since the Brooklyn Paper broke this story on March 14, the casualty list has grown: two opossums, a blackbird, a duck, seven fish, and yet another turtle were found dead near the entrails-strewn areas . The place looks like a “pet cemetery” said park-goer Ed Bahlman who did some amateur detective work of his own. He believes that the more recently found animal remains and/ or disembowelment are not a result of voodoo or sacrificial practices being conducted in the park, as many people suspect.

Observing the absence of blood around these latest slayings, Bahlman has concluded that someone is killing then “dumping dead animals in the park.” Be that as it may, what about the earlier blood-drenched death scenes? What about a police investigation?

They may be mystified but it’s been reported that park officials aren’t very concerned; they’ve taken a rather lackadaisical approach to this bloody state of affairs. Eugene Patron, a Prospect Park spokesman, says that “sick animals are pretty common after the long winter” and, in regard to the many lethargic swans and ducks, claims that the 60-acre lake isn’t contaminated with animal viscera.

I suppose it’s a pretty common thing for animals to sicken, perhaps start a campfire, and simply fall apart into heaps of entrails on their road to Valhalla. Who are we to question such mysterious commonplace occurrences?

The Brooklyn Paper

UPDATE (03/30): According to the Brooklyn Paper, the rescued swan in the top photo, “John Boy,” has died.

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